8 of the Most Instagrammable Hotels in Washington, DC

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8 of the Most Instagrammable Hotels in Washington, DC

Washington, DC, is loaded with monuments, museums, white columns, and neoclassical architecture. It’s also home to some of the country’s best and most beautiful hotels. Whether you’re coming to Washington, DC, for work, vacation, or you’re a local coordinating a place for out-of-town guests to stay, this list of eight of the most Instagrammable hotels in our nation’s capital is for you.

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Virginia Arrisueño + Kelly Towles for the Washington Post

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Virginia Arrisueño + Kelly Towles for the Washington Post

Back in April, I photographed Virginia Arrisueño and Kelly Towles for WP BrandStudio / Washington Post (with Destination DC being the end client). It was a “day in the life” photo shoot that took us from The LINE Hotel, to Kelly’s studio, Virginia’s 1st shop, in Navy Yard, uthe up to BUL, in Adams Morgan.

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I❤️NY

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I❤️NY

After a bonkers, non-stop six weeks of work, I took three days for myself and bounced up to NYC for a little decompression time. The Mapplethorpe exhibition at the Guggenheim, a photowalk around Harlem, a morning at the Met Cloisters, and time with lots of friends made for a nice time.

Guggenheim

When I was a kid I originally wanted to be an architect. I think Frank Lloyd Wright is mostly responsible for that. And even though I didn’t end up becoming an architect, FLW taught me how to see structures, which taught me how to see a structure’s relationship to its context, which means he basically taught me how to see the world. In many ways walking into the Guggenheim felt like a pilgimage to a holy site.

I’d planned on seeing the Mapplethorpe exhibition (which was stunning) and then I assumed I’d walk around for a bit and leave. I’d budgeted about 2 hours of my day for the museum. I ended up staying for 4 hours, much of it spent simply walking the spiral and soaking it all in. Best of all, though, was learning that their are stairs inside the Guggenheim and that they’re incredible, as well.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Implicit Tensions: Mapplethorpe Now is sublime and if you can go see it before it closes on July 10th you should.

Harlem with Kim Anderson

Kim Anderson is an amazing photographer and friend and I certainly didn’t want to miss seeing her while I was in town. The day we decided to meet for lunch also turned out to be NYC’s first legit spring day. Actually, 80º is maybe a bit more than “spring”, but it was the first warm and sunny day of the year and we didn’t waste it.

We ate at The Edge Harlem where the menu is divided into thirds: Jamaica, England, and New York, with the food reflecting those areas but still showing some fusion of them all. For example, the Jamaican section has a coconut fish burger but also a jerk shrimp caesar. Oh, they had plantains—the best I’ve had since I left Florida 7 years ago. And damn, I forgot how much I missed them! If you go (and you should) make sure to try the housemade sorrel, “a traditional Jamaican beverage made with hibiscus, spices & love,” the menu says. I had five glasses. Then we walked around Harlem and I pretended I didn’t have to use the bathroom the whole time. 😬

 
 
 

The Met Cloisters

I’d never even heard of the Met Cloisters until a week, or so, before this trip when my friend Peter told me I needed to go. He couldn’t have been more correct. From their website:

“The Met Cloisters, which opened to the public in 1938, is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. Located in Fort Tryon Park in northern Manhattan, on a spectacular four-acre lot overlooking the Hudson River, the modern museum building is not a copy of any specific medieval structure but is rather an ensemble informed by a selection of historical precedents, with a deliberate combination of ecclesiastical and secular spaces arranged in chronological order. Elements from medieval cloisters—Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa, Saint-Guilhem-le-Désert, Trie-sur-Baïse, Froville, and elements once thought to have come from Bonnefont-en-Comminges—and from other sites in Europe have been incorporated into the fabric of the building.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

191 Street station

Kim was with me at the Cloisters and once we were done she mentioned that I should see the 191st Street subway station so we ran through real quick. It’s a riot of color and I basically turned into an IRL hearteyes emoji.

 

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Faces of DC

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Faces of DC

Faces of DC is now viewable to the public at the corner of 7th and Madison NW, on the National Mall.

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WhyHotel

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WhyHotel

WhyHotel is a DC-based start up that operates pop-up hotels out of newly-constructed luxury apartment buildings. When they asked if I’d like to spend a night to try things out, I said yes.

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Glenstone Pavilions Press Preview

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Glenstone Pavilions Press Preview

On Friday I attended the press preview for Glenstone’s 204,000 square foot expansion, called the Pavilions, designed by Thomas Phifer, with site design by PWP Landscape Architecture. The experience exceeded all my expectations.

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